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Author Topic: Harv's Norman supercharger thread  (Read 218205 times)
Harv
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« Reply #60 on: October 17, 2013, 09:37:51 AM »
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AUD600F   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 automatic left hand drive 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1972-1973.
AUD600R   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 automatic left hand drive 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1972-1973.
AUD603F   HS4   Triumph Dolomite (E.C.E) 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD603R   HS4   Triumph Dolomite (E.C.E) 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD604F   HS4   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD604R   HS4   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD607F   HS4   Triumph 2.5 PI Conversion conversions settings 2498cc 6 cylinder engine 1974/ and Triumph 2500 TC 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD607R   HS4   Triumph 2.5 PI Conversion conversions settings 2498cc 6 cylinder engine 1974/ and Triumph 2500 TC 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD608   HS4   Austin Mini Mark II manual/automatic (E.C.E) export only 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1975, Austin Allegro 1100 (E.C.E) 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1975 and Morris Mini Mark II manual and automatic (E.C.E) export only 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1975.
AUD611   HS4   Austin Mini (E.C.E) 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD613L   HIF6   MG MGB GT V8 (E.C.E) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD613R   HIF6   MG MGB GT V8 (E.C.E) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD616F   HIF4   MG MGB (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD616R   HIF4   MG MGB (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD618   HS4   Austin Mini (Canada) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1973.
AUD619   HS6   Austin Allegro 1750 automatic (E.C.E) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976 and Austin Maxi 1750 automatic (E.C.E) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD620   HS6   Leyland International 185, 215, 220, van etc 1622cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD621   HS6   Leyland International 215, 220, 240, 250 LC van etc 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD623L   HIF6   Rover 3500 V8 P6 (E.C.E) and 3500S V8 P6 (E.C.E) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD623R   HIF6   Rover 3500 V8 P6 (E.C.E) and 3500S V8 P6 (E.C.E) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD624F   HS2   Triumph Spitfire Mark V (E.C.E) 1296cc 4-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD624R   HS2   Triumph Spitfire Mark V (E.C.E) 1296cc 4-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD625F   HS2   Triumph 1500 TC (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD625R   HS2   Triumph 1500 TC (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD627   HS4   Austin 7 cwt van (E.C.E) 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1973/ and Morris 7cwt van (E.C.E) 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD628   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 automatic (E.C.E) 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1975 and Vanden Plas Princess 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD630F   HIF4   MG MGB (U.S.A) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD630R   HIF4   MG MGB (U.S.A) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD631   HIF6   Rover 2200 SC 2204cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD632F   HIF6   Rover 2200 TC 2204cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD632R   HIF6   Rover 2200 TC 2204cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD633L   HS4   Innocenti Regent 1500 1498cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD633R   HS4   Innocenti Regent 1500 1498cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD634F   HS6   Triumph TR7 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD634R   HS6   Triumph TR7 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD635   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 automatic 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD646F   HS8   Rolls Royce B61 power unit 4887cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD646R   HS8   Rolls Royce B61 power unit 4887cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD647F   HS8AED   Daimler Limousine 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1974, Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973.
AUD647R   HS8   Daimler Limousine 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1974, Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973.
AUD648A   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche (U.S.A) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD648B   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche (U.S.A) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD653F   HS8AED   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1976 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
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« Reply #61 on: October 17, 2013, 09:38:28 AM »
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AUD653R   HS8   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1976 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD656A   HD8   Rolls Royce Phantom VI 6230cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD656B   HD8   Rolls Royce Phantom VI 6230cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD658   HS6   Leyland International 215, 220, 240, 250 LC automatic van etc 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD660   HS4C   Chrysler Hillman Hunter 1500 1496cc 4-cylinder engine 1975 and Chrysler Hillman Hunter 1724 1724cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
AUD661F   HS6   Triumph Dolomite Sprint (E.C.E) 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD661R   HS6   Triumph Dolomite Sprint (E.C.E) 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD662F   HS2   MG Midget Mark III (E.C.E) 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD662R   HS2   MG Midget Mark III (E.C.E) 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD663F   HS6   Triumph Sprint 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
AUD663R   HS6   Triumph Sprint 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
AUD664   HS4   Austin Mini (Canada) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD664L   HIF6   Rover 3500 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
AUD664R   HIF6   Rover 3500 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
AUD665F   HS4   MG Midget Mark 1500 (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Triumph Spitfire 1500 (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Triumph Toledo TS 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976 and Triumph 1500 TC 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD665R   HS4   MG Midget Mark 1500 (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Triumph Spitfire 1500 (E.C.E) 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Triumph Toledo TS 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976 and Triumph 1500 TC 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD666F   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 (Canada) 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD666R   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 (Canada) 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD667F   HS8AED   Daimler Limousine 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD667R   HS8   Daimler Limousine 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD668   HS2   Leyland International Mini salon/van/moke (Australia) 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD669L   HIF6   Rover 3500 (Japan) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD669R   HIF6   Rover 3500 (Japan) 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1973-1976.
AUD670   HS4   Morris Marina 1.3 (E.C.E) 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD671A   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow (Japan) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD671B   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow (Japan) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD672   HS4C   Chrysler Dodge 1800 1800cc 4-cylinder engine 1973/.
AUD673F   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC automatic (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD673R   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC automatic (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD674   HS2   Ford Escort 1100 and 1300 conversions settings 4-cylinder engines 1968/.
AUD676F   HS6   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD676R   HS6   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD677F   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 automatic (Canada) 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD677R   HIF6   Volvo B20B 144 automatic (Canada) 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1973-1974.
AUD678F   HS6   Triumph 2500 TC 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
AUD678R   HS6   Triumph 2500 TC 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
AUD679   HS4   Austin Mini Mark II manual/automatic (E.C.E) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Austin Mini Clubman manual/automatic (E.C.E) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976, Morris Mini Mark II automatic (E.C.E) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/ and Morris Mini Clubman manual and automatic (E.C.E) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD680F   HS6   Triumph Sprint 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD680R   HS6   Triumph Sprint 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD684   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD689   HS6   Chrysler Avenger 1800 (Brazil) 1800cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
AUD690   HS4C   Chrysler Avenger 1300 1295cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD692   HS6   Innocenti Mini 120 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD693   HS4   Innocenti Mini 90 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD697F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
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« Reply #62 on: October 17, 2013, 09:39:03 AM »
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AUD697R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD698F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD698R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
AUD699   HIF6   Volvo B20A 144 left hand drive 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD69L   HS2   MG 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1968, Riley Kestrel 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966, Vanden Plas Princess 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964 and Wolseley 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD69R   HS2   MG 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1968, Riley Kestrel 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966, Vanden Plas Princess 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964 and Wolseley 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD700   HS6   Leyland International Marina 1.7 (Australia) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD702A   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche (U.S.A) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD702B   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche (U.S.A) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1974/.
AUD704F   HS4C   Triumph 2000 and Vitesse conversions settings 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1966-1973.
AUD704R   HS4C   Triumph 2000 and Vitesse conversions settings 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1966-1973.
AUD706   HS4   Austin Mini van (G.P.O) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/ and Morris Mini van (G.P.O) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD707   HS4   Triumph Toledo 1300 1296cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
AUD708F   HS8   Rolls Royce B61 power unit 4887cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD708R   HS8   Rolls Royce B61 power unit 4887cc 6-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD710F   HS8AED   Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD710R   HS8   Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
AUD711   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1974.
AUD713   HS4   Austin Mini van (G.U.S) 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1975.
AUD81   HD6   Land-Rover 2.6 109 FWS (forward control) 2600cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1967.
AUD86   HS2   Austin Mini Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968, Morris Mini Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968, Riley Elf Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964 and Wolseley Hornet Mark I and Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1968.
AUD88C   HD8   Aston Martin D85 3.7-litre 6-cylinder 1962-1964 and D86 4-litre 6-cylinder engine 1965-1967.
AUD88F   HD8   Aston Martin D85 3.7-litre 6-cylinder 1962-1964 and D86 4-litre 6-cylinder engine 1965-1967.
AUD88R   HD8   Aston Martin D85 3.7-litre 6-cylinder engine 1962-1964 and D86 4-litre 6-cylinder engine 1965-1967.
AUD92F   HD8   Rover 2000 TC 1975cc 4-cylinder engine 1966.
AUD92R   HD8   Rover 2000 TC 1975cc 4-cylinder engine 1966.
AUD94F   HS6   Volvo B18B P1800 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1965 and Volvo B18D and P122S (pancake filter) 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD94R   HS6   Volvo B18B P1800 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1965 and Volvo B18D and P122S (pancake filter) 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD95F   HS6   Volvo B18B Snow Weasel (pancake filter) 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD95R   HS6   Volvo B18B Snow Weasel (pancake filter) 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD976   HS2   Morris Mini 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1968.
AUD97F   HS8   Vanden Plas Princess 4 litre R 3909cc 6-cylinder engine 1964.
AUD97R   HS8   Vanden Plas Princess 4 litre R 3909cc 6-cylinder engine 1964.
AUD983F   HS2   Triumph Spitfire Mark I and Mark II 950cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1966.
AUD983R   HS2   Triumph Spitfire Mark I and Mark II 950cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1966.
AUD99L   HS2   Austin Mini Cooper ‘S’ 1070cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964 and Morris Mini Cooper ‘S’ 1070cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD99R   HS2   Austin Mini Cooper ‘S’ 1070cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964 and Morris Mini Cooper ‘S’ 1070cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUF157F   HSD8TH   Jaguar Mark X 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1964.
AUF328R   HS2   MG Midget Mark III (U.S.A) 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1968-1969.
FZX1001F   HIF4   MG MGB (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1001R   HIF4   MG MGB (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1005F   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
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« Reply #63 on: October 17, 2013, 09:39:34 AM »
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FZX1005R   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1011   HS6   Morris Marina 1.8 (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974/.
FZX1012   HS6   Morris Marina 1.8 automatic (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1013F   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1013R   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1014F   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC automatic (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1014R   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC automatic (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1974-1976.
FZX1016   HS4   Austin Mini (Canada) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1022   HS4   Austin Allegro 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1023   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1027   HS2   Reliant Robin/Kitten 850 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1030   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 (Sweden) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1033   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa 1800 (Cyclopack air cleaner) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1035   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa (Cyclopack air cleaner) 1622cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1041   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa 185/215/220 1622cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1042   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa CV306 215-240 1622cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1043   HS4   Austin Mini 850 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1044   HS4   Austin Mini 1000 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1045   HS4   Austin Mini 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1046   HS4   Austin Mini 1275 GT 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1047   HS4   Austin Mini Clubman 1275 GT 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1049F   HIF7AED   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976, Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1049R   HIF7   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976, Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976 and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1051F   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1976.
FZX1051R   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1976.
FZX1053F   HIF7AED   Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1053R   HIF7   Jaguar 3.4 XJS 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1055   HIF6   Volvo B20A 1990cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1056   HIF6   Volvo B21A (Sweden) 2127cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1057   HIF6   Volvo B21A (Australia) 2127cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1059   HIF6   Volvo B27A 2664cc 6-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1060   HS4   Innocenti Mini 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1064   HS4   Austin Mini 850 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1065   HS4   Austin Mini 1000 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1066   HS4   Austin Mini 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1067   HS4   Austin Allegro 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1068   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1070F   HS6   Triumph 2500 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1070R   HS6   Triumph 2500 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1975.
FZX1071   HS4   Morris Marina 1.3 automatic 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1074   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 automatic 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1076   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/ and Austin Maxi 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1077   HS6   Austin Maxi 1750 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1086   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 automatic 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1087   HS6   Austin Maxi 1750 automatic (E.C.E) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1093L   HS6   Austin Allegro Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/ and Austin Maxi Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1093R   HS6   Austin Allegro Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/ and Austin Maxi Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1094   HS4   Austin Mini 1000 (Sweden) 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1095F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
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« Reply #64 on: October 17, 2013, 09:40:07 AM »
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FZX1095R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1096F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 automatic 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1096R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 automatic 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1098F   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 (Special Tuning) conversions settings 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1098R   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 (Special Tuning) conversions settings 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1099   HS6   Leyland International Marina 1.7 manual and automatic (South Africa) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1100   HS6   Leyland International Marina 1750 automatic (South Africa) 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1102   HS6   Leyland International Marina 2.6 automatic (South Africa) 2620cc 6-cylinder engine 1975-1976.
FZX1104A   HIF7   Rolls Royce Silver V8 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1104B   HIF7   Rolls Royce Silver V8 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1105F   HS6   Leyland International Triumph 2.5 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976 and Triumph 2.5 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976.
FZX1105R   HS6   Leyland International Triumph 2.5 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976 and Triumph 2.5 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976.
FZX1106   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 (Sweden) 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1116A   HD8   Rolls Royce V8 (Australia) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1116B   HD8   Rolls Royce V8 (Australia) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1117F   HS6   Leyland International Triumph 2500 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1117R   HS6   Leyland International Triumph 2500 (Australia) 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1121R   HS6   Austin Maxi Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1130F   HS6   Rover 2300 2300cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1130R   HS6   Rover 2300 2300cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1131F   HS6   Rover 2600 2600cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1131R   HS6   Rover 2600 2600cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1141A   HD8   Rolls Royce V8 Shadow 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1141B   HD8   Rolls Royce V8 Shadow 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1142   HS4   Austin Mini 850 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1146   HS4   Austin Mini 1000 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1975/.
FZX1160   HS4   Austin Mini 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1164   HS4   Austin Mini 1275 GT 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1170   HS4   Austin Allegro 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1172   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1174   HS4   Austin Allegro 1300 automatic 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1178   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/ and Austin Maxi 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1180   HS6   Austin Allegro 1500 automatic 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/ and Austin Maxi automatic 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1183L   HS6   Austin Allegro 1750 HL/Sport 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1183R   HS6   Austin Allegro 1750 HL/Sport 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1187   HS4   Morris Marina 1100 van 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1189   HS4   Morris Marina 1.3 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1191   HS4   Morris Marina 1.3 automatic 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1199   HS6   Morris Marina 1.8 SC (E.C.E) 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1201   HS6   Morris Marina 1.8 SC automatic 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1203F   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1203R   HS4   Morris Marina 1.8 TC 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1205   HIF6   Volvo B27A 2664cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1207   HS6   Austin Maxi 1750 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1209   HS6   Austin Maxi 1750 automatic 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1211L   HS6   Austin Maxi Hiline 1748cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1215   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1217   HS6   Austin Princess 1800 automatic 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976.
FZX1219F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1219R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1221F   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1221R   HIF6   Austin Princess 2200 2227cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
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« Reply #65 on: October 17, 2013, 09:40:40 AM »
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FZX1223   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa 185/215/220 1622cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1225   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa 1800 CV306 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1227   HS6   Leyland International Sherpa 1800 CV306 automatic 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1229F   HIF4   MG MGB 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1229R   HIF4   MG MGB 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1238   HS6   Volvo Snow Weasel 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/ and Volvo Snow Weasel 1788cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1242F   HS6   Triumph TR7 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1242R   HS6   Triumph TR7 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1250   HS6   Chrysler Avenger 1800 Hiline (Brazil) 1800cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1252F   HIF7AED   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/ and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1976\.
FZX1252R   HIF7   Daimler Sovereign 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/ and Jaguar 4.2 XJS 4235cc 6-cylinder engine 1976\.
FZX1257F   HS6   Triumph Sprint and TR7 (E.C.E) 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1257R   HS6   Triumph Sprint and TR7 (E.C.E) 1998cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1258F   HS4   Triumph 1500 Dolomite 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1258R   HS4   Triumph 1500 Dolomite 1493cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1259   HIF6   Volvo B21A 2127cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1263F   HS6   Triumph 2500 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1263R   HS6   Triumph 2500 2498cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1264F   HS6   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1264R   HS6   Triumph 2000 1998cc 6-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1265F   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1265R   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1854cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1267   HIF6   Volvo B21A (Canada) 2127cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1269   HS4   Triumph Dolomite 1300 1296cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1270L   HIF6   Rover 3500 V8 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1270R   HIF6   Rover 3500 V8 3528cc 8-cylinder engine 1976/.
FZX1275   HS2   Reliant Robin/Kitten 850 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1976/.
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« Reply #66 on: October 17, 2013, 09:44:33 AM »
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How Many Carbs do I Need – the Atkins Diet for Normans.
There are few things cooler than a big long string of SU carburetors hanging off the side of an engine. Whilst the S.U. carburetor design is somewhat forgiving (owing to it’s variable venture), there are plenty of reasons to get supercharger carburetor sizing correct, for example:
•   With an extra supercharger to squeeze in, space is at a premium under the bonnet.
•   Overly large carburetors can struggle with mixture control at part throttle operation.
From Supercharge!, Eldred suggests that on pump petrol a 92ci engine would require a single 1¾" S.U., a 122ci engine a 2" S.U., and a 183ci engine two 1¾” S.U.s. For racing or higher boost it would be necessary to double up on these. For a 132ci to 138ci Holden grey motor, this would suggest that a single SU would be suitable, or two 2” SUs for heavy service. The single SU is not an unusual Norman supercharger setup, with the SU being tucked into the back passenger’s side corner of the engine bay.
An alternative view on the number of carburetors needed comes from Tuning SU Carburettors by Speedsport Motorbooks. This reference gives the chart shown below for naturally aspirated engines:



Note that the chart indicates that racing engines may require one size larger carburetor than shown, that economy engines may be suitable with one size smaller, and that supercharged engines can produce 80% more power from a given carburetor and hence the carburetor can be correspondingly smaller. Taking this into account, the chart can be redrawn as follows for supercharged applications:



If we look at our supercharged 138ci Holden grey motor, and aim for a 50% power increase over the factory 75HP, then we are targeting around 110HP. The chart above shows that Eldred’s guidance of a single 2” SU is not too bad, with some spare capacity. So as a rough guide, two 1½” SUs or a single 2” SU are suitable for supercharged grey motors. For those not chasing grunt a single 1¾” or two 1¼” SUs may suffice. Those looking to push the grey to its limits should conside three 1¼” SUs.

Cheers,
Harv (deputy apprentice Norman fiddler).
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« Reply #67 on: October 20, 2013, 07:02:37 AM »
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heres one i have never seen before.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/VS57-MCCULLOCH-SUPERCHARGER-PAXTON-VINTAGE-RARE-FLATHEAD-Y-BLOCK-/261306953347?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3cd71bae83
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« Reply #68 on: October 20, 2013, 07:55:16 AM »
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McCullough VS57 - a mid 1950's centrifugal good for around 5psi. Common in the States - they made 1000's of them. More info here:

http://vs57.y-block.info/history.htm

Cheers,
Harv (appreciator of early engineering  Grin)
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« Reply #69 on: October 20, 2013, 08:01:22 AM »
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The Code stamped into the tag can be used with the table below to identify the original vehicle:
Code   Model   Vehicle
AUC864F   H4   Riley One-Point-Five 1498cc 4-cylinder engine 1957-1964.
AUC864R   H4   Riley One-Point-Five 1498cc 4-cylinder engine 1957-1964.
AUC968   HS6   Rover 2000 1975cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUC976   HS2   Austin Mini 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1968.
AUC979   HS2   Wolseley 1500 1485cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1964.
AUC982   HD8   Rover 3 litre Coupe P5 2995cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD1026A   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow (Sweden, Japan and Australia) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1975.
AUD1026B   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow (Sweden, Japan and Australia) 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1975.
AUD1040A   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1975/.
AUD1040B   HD8   Rolls Royce Silver Shadow/Corniche 6750cc 8-cylinder engine 1975/.
AUD104L   HS2   Austin Mini Cooper Mark I and Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1969, Morris Mini Cooper 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1969 and Universal Power Drives Unipower 998cc4-cylinder engine.
AUD104R   HS2   Austin Mini Cooper Mark I and Mark II 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1969, Morris Mini Cooper 998cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1969 and Universal Power Drives Unipower 998cc4-cylinder engine.
AUD109F   HD6TH   Jaguar 3.4 Mark III 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964 and Jaguar 3.8 Mark II 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD109R   HD6   Jaguar 3.4 Mark III 3442cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964 and Jaguar 3.8 Mark II 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD111C   HD8   Jaguar Mark X 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD111F   HD8TH   Jaguar Mark X 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD111R   HD8   Jaguar Mark X 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD112C   HD8   Jaguar ‘E’ Type 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD112F   HD8   Jaguar ‘E’ Type 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD112R   HD8   Jaguar ‘E’ Type 3781cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD114   HD8   Rover 3 litre P5 2995cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD115   HD8   Rover 3 litre 2995cc 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD118F   HS4   Reliant Sabre Ford (Zephyr) 1700cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD118R   HS4   Reliant Sabre Ford (Zephyr) 1700cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD120   HS2   Austin A35 van 848cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1970.
AUD124F   HD8   Austin Healey 3000 Mark III 2912cc 6-cylinder engine 1964.
AUD124R   HD8   Austin Healey 3000 Mark III 2912cc 6-cylinder engine 1964.
AUD128F   HD6   Alvis TD 21 6-cylinder engine1963-1964.
AUD128R   HD6TH   Alvis TD 21 6-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD129F   HD8   MG MGB Competition 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD129R   HD8   MG MGB Competition 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD13   HS2   Austin A40 Mark II 1098c 4-cylinder engine 1962-1967, Austin 1100 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1967, Austin 1100 Mark II 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1971, Morris Minor 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1962-1970 and Morris 1100 Mark II 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968.
AUD132L   HS2   Innocenti 1100 IM3 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD132R   HS2   Innocenti 1100 IM3 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1963-1964.
AUD135F   HS4   MG MGB and GT 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD135R   HS4   MG MGB and GT 1798cc 4-cylinder engine 1965-1966.
AUD136F   HS2   Austin-Healey Sprite MK III 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1966, Austin-Healey Sprite MK IV 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968, MG Midget Mark II 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964 and MG Midget Mark III 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968.
AUD136R   HS2   Austin-Healey Sprite MK III 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964-1966, Austin-Healey Sprite MK IV 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968, MG Midget Mark II 1098cc 4-cylinder engine 1964 and MG Midget Mark III 1275cc 4-cylinder engine 1967-1968.
AUD139L   HD8   Daimler V8 Majestic Major and Majestic 4561cc 8-cylinder engine 1964.


Please tell me you cut n pasted and didn't re type it all?
 Grin
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« Reply #70 on: October 20, 2013, 10:42:32 AM »
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Quote
Please tell me you cut n pasted and didn't re type it all?

Sadly, no - I typed that lot in.

There is a heap of SU info on the net, but this is the only place I know of that (now Grin) has all the various SU models listed electronically.

Cheers,
Harv (he of the weary keyboard fingers).
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« Reply #71 on: October 21, 2013, 04:41:53 PM »
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It would be sacriledge to talk SUs, and not mention the very, very large 3” SU carbs made specifically for Eldred Norman. To put this into perspective, if your typical Mini is running a pair of HS2s (or a single HS4), and your typical Norman-blown grey motor is running a pair of HS6 or a single HS8, this monster would be a  HS16. The carbs are even more rare than the superchargers themselves, and are twin-needle/jet setups. The twin needles are visible in the throat of the carburettor shown below (which I have taken from Supercharge!)... along with a 20c piece for perspective.



Note the size of the float bowl on the side of the carburettor... almost the size of a billy can.
The two photos below right show the 3” Norman SU on a grey motor located in one of the FE/FC Holden forum members vehicles.




The image below shows Keith Rilstone's 2.3L 280-300bhp ex-Eldred Norman Zephyr special. The photo was taken at the Mallala Race Circuit South Australia. The car was previously known as the the Norholfordor - because it was built from Holden, Ford and Tempo Matador parts, and then the Zephyr Eclipse (from the Adelaide Ford dealer, Eclipse Motors).



Red motor anyone?



Cheers,
Harv (appreciator of monster SUs)
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« Reply #72 on: November 13, 2013, 08:14:41 PM »
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tempted to buy this to run on my grey but dont know enough about them as to what size or how to fit
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« Reply #73 on: November 13, 2013, 09:13:50 PM »
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Rough as guts guidance:

a) its a later (Mike Norman) blower. Rare as rocking horse poo, but an order of magnitude more common that the (Eldred Norman) blowers.
b) Generally better suited to a red than a grey. Will need to be underdriven (0.5-0.8:1) on a grey.
c) Expensive if you are chasing grunt. Better if you are chasing period-chic.
d) Needs manifolds, pop-off valve, carbs and water injection. Count on a lot of cash unless you can weld (unlike me  Grin).
e) Very interested in casing length. Mike made a number of capcities by changing the extrusion length.

Cheers,
Harv
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« Reply #74 on: November 22, 2013, 03:29:03 PM »
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In this post, I will cover some of the preparations required for the casing liner. I know this is jumping around a bit from the last post on SUs, but that’s the price you pay for me doing this as a string of forum posts (if I did it as a Guide, the sequencing is more logical with less jumping around… but would take me longer to get the finished product to you).

Norman superchargers have an alloy casing with a steel liner. Later Norman superchargers (and potentially also the earlier ones) had the casing liner surface hardened by Tuff-Trided. Tuff-Triding (also known as salt bath ferritic nitrocarburizing) is a steel hardening process. It works by adding extra nitrogen and carbon into the iron. Tuff-Triding improves scuffing, fatigue and corrosion properties by producing a layer of hardened material (iron nitride) of 10-20µm (0.0003-0.0006”) thick, with a surface hardness of 800-1,500HV (Vickers scale – mild steel is typically 230HV, whilst tungsten carbide is 2,500 and diamond is 10,000HV). The metal under this thin, hard layer is also changed by the process.

Over time, the Tuff-Tride surface can be removed (by wear, corrosion or poor machining). To check if the Tuff-Tride treated surface is still present, copper sulphate can be used. If the hard iron nitride surface is still present, the copper sulphate won’t react. If the Tuff-Triding has been removed however the copper sulphate can get at the iron and will react (for the science geeks, the iron will reduce the copper, leading to the copper plating out: Fe + CuSO4 → FeSO4 + Cu). To do the testing:

a)  I bought some copper sulphate. This is available as “bluestone” from nurseries – it is a pretty common algaecide used to control weeds in paths and algae in water.
b) I sat the supercharger barrel horizontal, and cleaned the test area with some thinners - there must be no traces of oil on the surface to be tested.
c) I made up a 5 - 10% solution of copper sulphate dissolved in distilled water. This is the blue liquid you can see in the photos sitting in an upturned grey spray paint tin lid.
d) I applied a dab of the solution to the surface being inspected, leaving in place for 30 - 40 seconds.
f)  If there is discoloration (i.e. the solution changes from a light blue colour to transparent and the steel surface takes on a copper/rust color) after this time, the Tuff-Tride treatment has been removed. If the solution stays a blue colour, the Tuff-triding is still present.
g) I washed down the steel surface immediately with plenty of water, as copper sulphate is corrosive. I then re-oiled the surface to protect against rust.

When I did the testing, I found that the Tuff-Triding was still present on my small Norman, my large Norman and Gary’s large Norman. However, the Tuff-Triding had been removed from the surface of Gary’s Type 65 Norman. You can see in the photo where the copper from the copper sulphate solution has plated out onto the liner surface (don’t panic, this copper does not stick to the casing, and wipes off easily).

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« Reply #75 on: November 22, 2013, 03:29:45 PM »
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Later machining of the Type 65 shows that although the Tuff-Triding had been removed from the surface, it still had a thin hard layer underneath (this is the changes in the parent metal that also come with Tuff-Triding). Note that so far I haven’t tested my water cooled Norman or my clutched Norman as I ran out of time – I wanted the casings cleaned and checked before testing and machining.

The reason for the above testing is to work out whether or not to hone the casings. Honing is required to clean up any small surface scratches in the casing, and more importantly to leave behind a cross-hatch pattern. The cross-hatching provides a surface that will retain an oil film, which we need to lubricate the vanes as they whizz around (retaining an oil film is exactly the same reason that engine cylinders are honed). For sliding vane superchargers that are not case-hardened (for example Judson superchargers) honing is undertaken at all overhauls. However, there is a bit of a trade-off here if the surface is Tuff-Trided, like the Normans. Honing will generally remove 0.003-0.005” of material  (… or more if heavy handed). Bearing in mind that the original Tuff-Triding is probably only 0.0003-0.0006” thick (maybe 0.0015” if it is old, old Tuff-Triding), there is a pretty good chance that honing will remove the case hardening. This will reduce the life of the supercharger barrel. It is of course possible to press out the barrel liner, have it case hardened again and refitted… though this is a pretty substantive task with good risk of damage and expensive. It really becomes a balance between good oiling (and hence longer vane life) against reduced casing life. For what it’s worth (and after having had a good long discussion with a very experienced machine shop and a Tuff-Triding shop), I take the following view:
a)   If the case hardening is not present, hone the casing.
b)   If the case hardening is present, but the casing shows significant corrosion or heavy scratches, hone the casing.
c)   If the case hardening is present, but the casing is otherwise OK, do not hone the liner.
Note that an alternative to honing (say to remove very limited corrosion) is to polish internally by either lapping with emery cloth (grade 360 or finer), or blasting with glass beads (size 40-70μm in diameter, with pressure less than 4 bar). Polishing in this manner is supported by the Tuff-Tride process owner (  Reference: TUFFTRIDE®-/QPQ®-PROCESS Technical Information, Dr. Joachim Boßlet / Michael Kreutz, Durferrit GmbH (http://www.durferrit.com).), but can however partly reduce the corrosion resistance of the liner.

Using the above logic, I took the decision to hone my small Norman (case hardening present, but casing showing significant corrosion) and Gary’s Type 65 Norman (case hardening worn off), but did not hone Gary’s large Norman or my large Norman (case hardening present and casings generally in good condition). The honing was completed by Duncan Foster Engineering, one of the few places around that have hones for the large diameter supercharger barrels (many engine reconditioners can only hone smaller engine-cylinder type diameters). The photos attached show the nice cross-hatching obtained.



Cheers,
Harv (deputy apprentice Norman supercharger fiddler)
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« Reply #76 on: November 26, 2013, 11:12:56 AM »
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For this post, we will take a look at the rotors that are used in Norman superchargers. Now that we are starting to look at internals, the sketch below may help to better visualize the way that the Normans are put together:



The shaft of a sliding vane supercharger  supports the rotor, which may be made from steel or from aluminum alloy. Whilst Norman superchargers have solid rotors, some supercharger rotors are made from hollow extruded sections in order to minimize weight. The rotor may be mounted centrally within the casing, or may be mounted eccentrically (Norman superchargers are eccentric, whilst the vanes in many air tools are mounted centrally). The rotor contains a number of slots (two, four, six or more), which may be radial or tangential (Norman superchargers are tangential), whilst air tools for example are often radial).



The slots carry the rotor vanes, which are free to slide in and out of the slots. Centripetal force causes the vanes to be held outwards against the walls of the casing, forming a seal.

A significant change is noticeable between Eldred’s earlier rotors and the later ones produced by Mike Norman. The earlier rotors are steel, drilled through with the steel drive shaft welded in. These rotors are four-vane units as per the left-hand image below. The later model rotors are machined from a light alloy bar before being fitted with a steel driveshaft. These rotors are three-vane units, as per the right-hand image below.



Additionally, the later model rotors have Tuff-Trided sheet steel inserts riveted into the vane slots (as per the red lines on the image below) to decrease rotor slot wear. The inserts can be seen riveted into the vane slots in the left hand corner of the photo below.





A typical rotor (this is Gary’s Type 65) is shown below:



At some stage I'll sketch up the rest of the rotors and post them here (time is not on my side at the moment  :oops: ).

The rotors have a number of common features:
• Lands at either end of the shaft to support both the drive-end and non-drive end bearings,
• A land at the drive end to support the drive-end seal,
• A keyway milled into the drive-end of the shaft to provide axial locking of the drive pulley, and
• A threaded section at the end of the shaft to mount the pulley retaining nut.
Note that Norman superchargers do not have thrust bearings. Any thrust loading is transferred through to the drive-end and non-drive end bearings. To minimize thrust (and maintain adequate clearance) care needs to be taken in the selection of the gaskets between the main casing and end plates. Whilst no guidance exists for the Normans, typical Judson supercharger practice is to select the gasket thickness such that 0.010” float exists between the rotor and end case at each end.

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« Reply #77 on: November 26, 2013, 11:13:36 AM »
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As the rotor spins, the vanes are forced against the casing wall by centripetal force. The eccentric rotor position means that the vanes slide in and out as the rotor spins. When the vanes are travelling into the rotor, they develop some inertia, and want to keep travelling inwards. As the rotor keeps spinning to the point that the vanes should come out again, the vanes will have a tendency to stay in the rotor slot and hence lift off the casing wall slightly. This tends to happen after the discharge port is passed (and before the inlet port is reached) and hence is probably not much of an efficiency loss. However, the lift-off adds to the supercharger nose, and the repeated banging of the vanes is probably not good for their longevity. To combat the vane lift-off, the latter alloy rotors are fitted with vane springs. The springs are fitted into holes (pockets) drilled into each rotor slot. A plastic bush is fitted between the compression spring and the vane prior to the vane being inserted into the rotor. The springs provide an outwards force on the vane, similar to the centripetal force that normally pushed the vanes out.

The spring operation will be periodic – typically the vehicle will run for 30-60 minutes at a time, with rest periods in between when the car is shut down. During rest periods the springs will be at ambient temperature, though during service will increase. The springs will typically cycle at around crankshaft speed – say a maximum of 4500 cycles per minute, though probably on average 2500 cycles per minute. The springs will operate in an environment of a gasoline/air/oil vapour, with some humidity. Whilst no free water is likely, water content may approach saturation. It is a fair assumption that the springs will only be checked when the supercharger is overhauled – if we used Eldred’s guidance of servicing every 20,000 miles, then the springs are likely to complete 65 million cycles before seeing daylight again. All of this adds up to a very harsh operating environment for a spring to operate in – bear in mind that typical commercially available springs (other than specialties like valve springs) are normally only factory fatigue tested to 10,000 cycles. Most commercial springs are also good for only around ¾” of deflection, whilst the Norman springs deflect around 1½”. The original springs have a reputation for failing in service, and are often removed by enthusiasts to prevent failure. If the springs do fail in service, most (if not all) the shards of spring are likely to be held in place by the plastic bushes, largely preventing them from entering the engine. However, there is a good chance of the hardened steel spring shards chewing out the soft alloy rotor pocket. The image above shows an original spring and bush, together with one that had failed in service.  



The original springs have dimensions as shown in the image below, and a stiffness of approximately 3.7lb/inch.



For those seeking replacement springs, Century Spring Corporation part number 12063 are very similar… though resist the temptation to use them, as discussion with Century show that the fatigue life is not likely to be suitable due to the spring steel material used (the springs are also a trifle heavy at 5.1lb/inch). Custom springs are likely to be required for long-term use. A suitable supplier for the springs is Boynes Springs (6 Sarich Court Osborne Park, Western Australia  6017 Australia, Telephone: (08) 94465666, Facsimile: (08) 92441465, Email: info@boynessprings.com.au, Internet: http://www.boynessprings.com.au), who can make the required springs. If anyone wants some springs for their Norman, give me a yell (I had a few spare ones made up  :mrgreen: ).
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« Reply #78 on: November 26, 2013, 11:14:15 AM »
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The bushes noted above have the following dimensions:



Note that the bushes could be readily made from either nylon or PTFE (Teflon). Care needs to be taken when using nylon, as some grades of nylon (for example Nylon 6.11) have melting temperatures as low as 190ºC. Whilst the supercharger will not operate that hot (without pinging its head off), the localized friction of the bushes running in their pockets will certainly increase temperature. Because of this, PTFE (with a melting temperature of 327ºC) is a better choice. As a side note, I have a 1' length of teflon bar at home that I need to machine down into the above bushes (some for me and some spares). If there are any machinists out there who would undertake this for me, I'd love to hear from you (my lathe skills are pretty poor  :oops: ).

The vanes used in Norman superchargers are made from Bakelite, also known as  polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride. Bakelite is an early plastic, and is thermosetting (i.e. when you heat it up, it will char rather than melting). Bakelite saw quite some use in the automotive industry, for example in the manufacture of rotor buttons and distributor caps for early Holdens. The Bakelite used in Norman supercharger rotors is sometimes referred to as phenolic sheet or canvas Bakelite. This is made by applying heat and pressure to layers of cotton fabric impregnated with Bakelite resin to make a laminate. Bakelite in this form has good mechanical properties (as per the table below), is strong, rigid, shows negligible creep or cold flow under load whilst still being light (about 20-25% the weight of steel).


Canvas Bakelite is suitable for a continuous operating temperature of around 120ºC (130ºC peak).
Dimensions for some of the different Norman supercharger vanes are given below:




In the above diagrams, the darker sections represent the main portion of the vanes, whilst the lighter portions represent grooves that are milled into the trailing edge of the vanes. Note that some of the grooves are milled all the way across the face of the vane, whilst others are milled only partially across the face. The grooves are likely to be used to assist the vanes in being able to move in and out of the rotor. The vanes should be a “flop” fit, though may experience some changes in dimensions due to moisture, fuel properties or dirt. If the vanes become a tight fit, the oily environment they operate in may allow them to form a seal with the rotor. In this case, the vanes will draw a vacuum at the vane root as they try to slide out, or will build pressure at the vane root as they slide back in. The slots allow the vane root to equalize pressure, allowing the vanes to slide freely. The slots also allow some flow of air/fuel/oil around the vane, helping lubrication.



Note that some vanes also have one or two notches cut into them. The notches correspond to the vane springs, giving the plastic bushes a location to bear on the vanes. Interestingly, the Type 65 rotor in Gary’s Norman had a notch despite the rotors not having pockets for springs… perhaps an over-enthusiastic vane replacement in the past.

A suitable supplier for the vanes is Bearing Thermal Resources (5 Kerr Court Rowville, Victoria 3178 Australia, Telephone: (03) 97642009, Facsimile: (03) 97641009, Email: sales@btresources.com.au, Internet: http://www.btresources.com.au), who can make the required vanes.

Cheers,
Harv (deputy apprentice Norman supercharger fiddler).
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« Reply #79 on: November 28, 2013, 12:07:07 PM »
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For this post we will take a look at the bearings and seals used in the Normans.

Norman superchargers typically have two bearings. The drive-end of the machine is fitted with a single row ball bearing, whilst the non-drive end is fitted with a roller bearing. Dimensions of the bearings are given in the table below:



With respect to bearing lubrication, three different types of bearing arrangement are evident.  In the first configuration, there is a very small gap between the casing and the rotor. This can be seen in the image below. The small gap will largely prevent the air/fuel/oil mixture (passing through the supercharger) from passing over the bearing. This means that the bearing cannot be effectively lubricated by the oil. If the bearing is of the sealed type, then no lubrication issue exists as the factory grease will provide lubrication. However, if the bearing is an open type then lubrication will be very poor, and will rely heavily on the grease packing installed during overhaul.



In the second type of configuration, the casing is more open, with a large gap between the casing and rotor. This can be seen in the image below. In this case the air/fuel mixture will have more contact with the bearing, and may provide some lubrication. Note however that the bearing is not oil immersed, and there is no real flow across the bearing face as one end of the bearing is blanked by the seal. The lubrication of the bearing will be very limited, and again grease packing during overhaul is recommended.



In the third configuration, the seal is observed to be installed inboard of the bearing, as per the image below. In this case the air/fuel/oil mixture provides no lubrication to the bearing. However, I have only seen this undertaken with sealed bearings, were lubrication is not required.


In choosing a suitable grease, care must be taken to choose an appropriate grade. For overhauling Norman superchargers I would recommend a grease such as Shell Gadus S3 T100. This grease:
a)   is suitable for roller and ball bearings (pretty damn important given that is what it is going onto… some greases used for king pin and chassis greasing will not be suitable),
b)   is good for 160ºC (a high temperature range is important particularly if no water injection is used),
c)   can handle higher bearing speeds,
d)   is water tolerant (important if we are using water injection upstream of the supercharger), and
e)   has a long service life (important as Norman superchargers are generally not fitted with grease nipples).
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